Monday, August 31, 2015

Warren Beatty & Madonna



[Warren Beatty and Madonna at Francesco Clemente's New Years Eve Party, 1990-1991 - Photograph by Allen Ginsberg - courtesy the Allen Ginsberg Photography Collection at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library a tthe University of Toronto, Canada]

Among the more unusual snaps (unusual subjects) in the Allen Ginsberg Photography Collection (now housed in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto) are these ones of Madonna and Warren Beatty, taken in 1990-1991, on the occasion of Francesco Clemente's New Years Eve party.  

"The greatest romance of the whole entire 1990's" gushed Amy Rose Spiegel on Buzzfeed, a couple of years back.

Out provides some of the more "juicy" snippets from Peter Biskind's 2010 biography - Star: How Warren Beatty Seduced America - here

As recently as March of this year, on the Howard Stern radio show, Madonna looked back fondly on the relationship, and confessed, "Yes he was (an incredible lover), I'm not going to lie".

The couple first met while co-starring in the filming of the comic-strip classic, Dick Tracy. The movie (directed by Beatty himself) had premiered only six months before these shots of Allen's were taken (Madonna played "Breathless Mahoney", Beatty played Tracy).

Madonna's own 1991 documentary, Truth or Dare (In Bed With Madonna) also "captures" Beatty.

The chemistry unrehearsed.


[Warren Beatty and Madonna at Francesco Clemente's New Years Eve Party, 1990-1991 - Photograph by Allen Ginsberg - courtesy the Allen Ginsberg Photography Collection at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto, Canada] 






Sunday, August 30, 2015

Ginsberg at UMass, Lowell, part 2 - (Whalen,Sakaki, Creeley,Wieners, Corso




Allen Ginsberg's Beat class (at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell) continues

AG: There's another interesting poet almost as old as (Jack) Kerouac, that was part of the..what was called San Francisco Renaissance - Philip Whalen. Anybody ever heard of him? [a show of hands] - a few - He's… Now, as you know, there is some interest n Buddhism and Zen - Kerouac's Dharma Bums - and Philip Whalen was a prototype for Kerouac's character, [Ben Fagan in Big Sur] Warren Coughlin, in Dharma Bums.
And Whalen now is the Abbot of the Hartford Street Zen Center in San Francisco, meaning that he's a sensei (or, in Zen, as you get older, they call you roshi, or a Zen master) - and so he's now the first poet, American poet, first Postmodern Zen master.


                                                            [Philip Whalen (1923-2002)]

"Further Notice" - (this is 1956) - "I can't live in this world/And I refuse to kill myself/Or let you kill me./ The dill plant lives, the airplane/My alarm clock, this ink/I won't go away/  I shall be myself/ Free, a genius, an embarrassment/Like the Indian, the buffalo/ Like Yellowstone National Park" - (See, sort of self-empowering, like Whitman, that one). But (also) his later work is really interesting. I made a choice, (a) selection of short, short poems by him. "Dewey Swanson" - ("ran lunatic in the midst of our/canoeing trip had to tie him/up and sit on him in the bottom/of the canoe in the daytime"…"we never would have found him except/for his talking and we never did catch/him asleep from the time he first/started acting funny") -  (And) there's a little poem from 1967 (he goes to Japan all the time [sic]) - "A Couple of Blocks South of the Heian Shrine" (a very famous sacred shrine in Kyoto) - "She builds a fire of small clean white square sticks/balanced on top of a small white clay hibachi" (hibachi?, you know, a little portable stove that you can put things on, with charcoal) - "balanced on top of a small white clay hibachi/which stands on a sewing-machine set between her/house wall and the street where my taxi honks past" - It's quick - like he took, like, a little photograph, but he noticed it and he got it all down - '"She builds a fire of small clean white square sticks/ balanced on top of a small white clay hibachi/which stands on a sewing-machine set between her/house wall and the street where my taxi honks past"- You don't get the.. the very last thing - you suddenly realize, wow! how quick! . (From) 1968, (a) two-line poem - "Sadly unroll sleeping bag:/The missing lid for teapot!" And then this one has a really weird title -  "Allegorical Painting: Capitalistic Society Destroyed By The Contradictions Within Itself (Second Five Year Plan)" - "feeble claw blanket grab disappear foot hog/crackling Oklahoma dustbowl (Virgil Thompson)/whisker tickles shoulder - eye sinus bulge/with %&% cock numb and warm…"…"..I cannot acccept /the ending of a day no more light I cannot wait/for night when bed fucking blowing  jacking-off is/possible at last naked safe and pleasure" - (it's real fast, (it's) ba-bam, all those thoughts - so his motto (for) his poetry is (was) "My poetry is a picture of a mind moving" [from "Since You Asked"] - and you sure get that fast with this).  "Alleyway" - "That darling baby!/All wrapped up asleep/In his fuzzy blue bunting/An extra blanket carefully pinned/Around him asleep on the ground/Between two boxes of rubbish/Beside the overflowing garbage cans/All alone. Throwed way." (that's something - sweet, really) - "Epigram on Himself" - "People can forgive all my faults/They despise me for being fat" (and he is fat!) - "Untied Airlines" - "The world's tiniest apple pie and library paste for lunch/Where to go/I want out" - "Powell & Market Street, San Francisco" - "Fat man waves tiny Bible/Shouting threats about Jesus/Nearby, a younger thinner man (high on something else?) /starts undressing" (Powell and Market is a place where a lot of the cranks make speeches in San Francisco) -"Fat man waves tiny Bible/Shouting threats about Jesus/Nearby, a younger thinner man (high on something else, question mark) starts undressing" - "The Turn" ("Walking along Elm Road/Handful of nasturtiums, butter, some kind of bread"…"The dogs are scared and their people scandalized/"What are you trying to do? HAY! What are you trying to do?"/I had nothing to tell them, I was talking to their dogs") - "The Laundry Area" ("Each time I hang up a washboard/The slenderest thread of cold water/Runs down my wrist and into my armpit/Without wetting my clothes" (universal but probably nobody else noticed it ever before) - "When hanging up the washboard/The slenderest thread of cold water/Runs down my wrist and into my armpit/Without wetting my clothes" - And as a Zen Master by 1978, or Zen student - "Cynical Son" ("You do what you do/Fucky-ducky/You do it anyhow/People don't like it/Fucky-ducky/People like it/Fucky-ducky/You do what you do/Fucky-ducky" - So that's for Philip Whalen - interesting.

                                                          [Nanao Sakaki (1923-2008)]

(Next a) Japanese poet, who's a friend of Gary Snyder, Philip Whalen, and myself, Nanao Sakaki, who writes in English (and is) part of the same generation (that were) born in 1923 - "If you have time…" [Allen begins reading] - I'll put it in his voice, in his accent [sic] - "If you have time to chatter/Read books/If you have time to read/Walk into mountain, desert and ocean/If you have time to walk/sing songs and dance/Sit quietly, you Happy Lucky Idiot" And here is a poem called "Future Knows" - "Thus I have heard" (That is the beginning of a Buddhist sutra - "Thus I have heard" this, that, or the other - "Thus I heard" - to (a) teacher's question/) - "Oakland, California - /To teacher's question/An eleven-year-old girl answered/"The ocean is/ A huge swimmming pool with cement walls"/ On a starry summer night/At a camping ground in Jaoan/A nine-year-old boy from Tokyo complained/ "Ugly, too many stars"/ At a department store in Kyoto/One of my friends bought a beetle/ For his son, seven years old /A few hours later/ The boy brought his dead bug/ to a hardware store, asking/"Change battery, please."


                                                                  [Robert Creeley 1926-2005)]

And Robert Creeley - [to Robert Creeley, in the audience] Do you want to read these or should I? - okay, I'll make a quick selection - "The Operation" (about a marriage difficulty, a couple's marriage breaking up - "By Saturday I said you would be better on Sunday/ The insistence was a part of a reconciliation./  Your eyes bulged, the grey/light hung on you, you were hideous./ My involvement is just an old habitual relationship/ Cruelm cruel to describe/what there is no reason to describe" - "The Conspiracy" (this is one of my favorite poems, from 1955-56, when we were all getting together around then..) - "You send me your poems,/I'll send you mine" - first line - that's called "The Conspiracy" - " You send me your poems,/I'll send you mine./ Things tend to awaken/even through random communication./ Let us suddenly/proclaim spring, And jeer/at the others/all the others./ I will send a picture too/if you will send me one of you" (that's sort of laconic, but very sweet actually) - "The Lover" - "What should the young/man say, because he is buying/Modess? Should he/ blush or not. Or/ turn coyly, his head, to/one side, as if in/ the exactitude of his emotion he/were not offended? Were/proud?/Of what? To buy/ a thing like that" (so that's the same Americanese that's in Kerouac, regular, somebody talking, making his own idiom, spoken idiom). (And) this sort of encompasses all of Walt Whitman (so, "I celebrate myself and sing myself..") - "Like They Say"- "Underneath the tree on some/soft grass I sat, I / watched two happy/ woodpeckers be dis-/turbed by my presence. And/ why not, I thought to/myself, why/not" - (Do you get it? - that he wasn't guilty that the woodpeckers were disturbed by his presence, that he was able to sit down in soft grass and…)
So, but then these are (all) early, pretty late, much later, (in the (19)80's) ,"First Rain" ("These  retroactive small/instances of feeling/ reach out for a common/ ground in the wet/first rain of a faded/ winter. Along the grey/ iced sidewalk revealed/piles of dogshit, papers/ bits of  old clothing , are/the human pledges. call them, "We are here and/have been all the time"/ I walk quickly. The wind/ drives the rain, drenching/ my coat, pants, blurrs/ my glasses, as I pass.")  - (So he's just taking a very simple awareness of his own presence, and going on to..  (like today's rain), "blurring your glasses" - "dog shit, papers /bits of old clothing,.. human pledges..."
 Later on, "Still Too Young" ("I was talking to older/man on the phone/ who's saying something/and something are five/ when I think it's four,/and all I'd hoped for/ is going up in abstract smoke,/and this call is from California/and selling a house, /in fact, two houses,/ is losing me money, more/than I can afford to/and I thought I was winning/but I'm losing again/ but I'm too old to do it again/and still too young to die."  (What's interesting to me about this is that it's almost like he figured out one line, he doesn't know what's going to come next, and he figured out another line, and that changes what the first line meant , and then he figured out another.. then another line comes, logicallyy, and that changes everything before that. So it's like turning a Venetian blind. By the time you get to the end, it's all locked in, it all makes complete sense. Everything is explained 
 ("I was  talking to older/man on the phone.." (it's called "Still Too Young") -  "I was talking to older/man on the phone/ who's saying something/and something are five" (saying something and something are five)  - "when I think it's four,/and all I'd hoped for" (hoped for) "is going up in abstract smoke /and this call is from California/and selling a house, /in fact, two houses,/ is losing me money, more/than I can afford to/and I thought I was winning/but I'm losing again/ but I'm too old to do it again/and still too young to die."

And some funny little things in here, little poems, like "Go" - "Push that little/thing up and the/other right down,/It'll work" (a description of the universe, or sex, or a little toy  "Go" ( I think he's got children, (he's got) six kids (so he's been in this situation, I guess, a lot") "Push that little/thingp and the/other right down,/It'll work"  - "Memories" ( "Hello, duck/in yellow/ cloth stuffed from/inside out,/little pillow" (maybe a little something he remembers from childhood or something he got given as a kid) -  - "Lovers" ("Remember? as  kids/we'd looked in crypt/had we fucked/ we walked a Saturday/in cemetery it/was free the flowers/the lanes we looked/in past the small/barred window into/dark of tomb when/it looked out at us/face we saw white/looking out at us/inside the small/room was it man/who worked there dead/person's fraught skull?" - (That's a New England vision! ) 
ok. that's some of Robert Creeley. So Robert's reading tonight (reading new works, I guess).


[Gregory Corso (1930-2001)]

I'd like to get on to a couple of little poems of Gregory Corso , the un-well-known as Kerouac is well-known - (Gregory doesn't get around that much) - "The Last Gangster"
[Allen breaks off - "Who's the host here? What time does the class begin and end?" - He's told to "go right ahead" - "Pardon me? No, my question was what time did the class begin and  formally end?. It's a quarter-to now, so we should end in five minutes right? - is that correct?   (And) if anybody wants to hang around I'll continue a bit..] 
By Corso, one of the early poems, "The Last Gangster" ("Waiting by the window/my feet enwrapped with the dead bootleggers of Chicago/I am the last gangster, safe, at last,/waiting by a bullet-proof window/ I look down the street and know/the two torpedoes from St Louis./ I've watched them grow old/...guns rusting in their arthritic hands") - (and)  "Birthplace Revisited" ("I stand in the dark light in the dark street/and look up at my window, I was born there./The lights are on: other people are moving about./I am with raincoat: cigarette in mouth,/hat over eye/I cross the street and enter the building/The garbage cans haven't stopped smelling./I walk up the first flight; Dirty Ears/aims a knife at me.../I pump him full of lost watches.") 
A late poem by Corso (that was early, now late), a poem called "The Whole Mess (Almost)" - the whole mess of life, or, everything you want to know about everything important…. - [Allen reads "The Whole Mess (Almost) "] - "I ran up six flights of stairs/to my small furnished room/opened the window/and began throwing out/those things most important in life.."…."…suddenly realized Humor/was all that was left - All that I could do with Humor was to say, "Out the window with the window!"'


                                                                        [John Wieners (1934-2002)]

So the last thing I want to read here is from…well, there's a lot of good stuff here, from John Wieners, a late poem, a kind of interesting.., well, not late but middle-period poem (John Wieners will be reading tonight) - "Children of the Working Class" (Wieners is a very interesting poet (sort of a poet of love, gay, been, sort of many times sort of frustrated, been in mental hospitals (and out)) And this is the time, 1972, when he was in Taunton State Hospital ,  written from in there, called "Children of the Working Class"  [Allen reads John Wieners' "Children of the Working Class" in its entirety] - "gaunt, ugly deformed…."…"...I am witness. not to Whitman's vision but instead the/poorhouses, the mad city asylums and re-/lief work lines. Yes, I am witness not to/ God's goodness, but to his better or less scorn".

 It's a very powerful poem, and very, very much (meaningful)

So, I'm running overtime, but we have (a few moments left)..so, thank you

So I was trying to give you a little brief survey, a range of poems, by various poets, related to the Beat Generation, that you might not get in your antholoie (for the course)  

class ends here

Saturday, August 29, 2015

Ginsberg at UMass, Lowell - part 1 (Burroughs and Kerouac)



[Allen Ginsberg at the UMass (Lowell)]

Courtesy the video archives of the Jack and Stella Kerouac Center For Public Humanities (scroll down), Allen Ginsberg speaking on and reading from William Burroughs, Jack Kerouac, Philip Whalen, Nanao Sakaki, Robert Creeley, Gregory Corso, and John Wieners, recorded at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell, 1991

Following a broef introduction by Bill Roberts, the head of the English department (who notes Robert Creeley is in the house) and Hamid Shirvani, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Allen begins speaking

AG: Actually, my understanding is that this is a class, or the core here is a class, in "Beat Literature"?  - Is that right?. So that was what I was aiming at. So what other classes are there here? So there's the Beat class and then just miscellaneous students from other classes..?..."Modern Poetry" - What else? Anything else?… and of "Writing" 


So what I thought I would do.. I've been teaching a class in "Beat Literature" also, at Brooklyn College, and also at Naropa Institute in Boulder, Colorado, the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics (and I taught that for years, on and off, and, in the course of that, made a little anthology of Beat, or pseudo-Beat, or Beat-allied, writing). So in the Beat class, did you study any of Gregory Corso's work? - John Wieners? - how many here have heard of John Wieners? - one? - Well, John Wieners is going to be reading tonight along with Robert Creeley and myself (and Robert is not exactly a "Beat" writer, but we've been friends and allies and is sort of an honorary Beat, or Original Beat, or Post-Beat, or Postmodern Beat, or…).  So all three of us will be reading tonight, so you're welcome there. And Robert Creeley and I think that John Wieners is one of the major poets of this half of the century [twentieth century] in America, and so those of you who are studying either "Writing","American Poetry", or "Beat Literature" would do well to pick up on him. 

So what I thought I would do is read a few poems from various different writers that are connected with the Beat movement and maybe you get acquainted that way (recognizing that) the subject is "Beat and Kerouac" for the Kerouac Convention here [Lowell Celebrates Kerouac]


[William Burroughs - Photograph by Allen Ginsberg]

So, (to begin with an elder, William Burroughs. How many have read some of Burroughs? - almost everybody, I guess. And I have a favorite passage of Burroughs which was used in that movie of Naked Lunch, called "The Market", from which.. I don't know if any of you saw.. what was it? - it was that cafe where Venusians and people from weird planets got together to get drunk? - [Star Wars] - Star Wars, yeah, actually..Star Wars ripped off Burroughs from "The Market" -  Allen begins reading Burroughs] - "Panorama of the City of Interzone . Opening bars of "East St. Louis Toodle-oo"… "at times loud and clear then faint and intermittent like music down a windy street…The Composite City where all human potentials are spread out in a vast silent market……Gaming tables where the games are played for incredible stakes. From time to time a player leaps up with a despairing cry, having lost his youth to an old man or become Latah to his opponent. But there are higher stakes than youth or Latah, games where only two persons in the world know what the stakes are.." - (just like life!) - "All houses in the City are joined…."….
"In the City market is the Meet Café" -  (this is where Star Wars comes in) - “In the City Market is the Meet Café. Followers of obsolete, unthinkable trades doodling in Etruscan, addicts of drugs not yet synthesized, pushers of souped-up harmine, junk reduced to pure habit offering precarious vegetable serenity, liquids to induce Latah, Tithonian longevity serums.." - (Tithys was promised eternal life by the Gods, but they didn't promise him a young ever-youthful boy, so he wound up dust in a bottle, talking and wanting to be annihilated) - "Tithonian longevity serums.." - "...black marketeers of World War III, excusers of telepathic sensitivity, osteopaths of the spirit, investigators of infractions denounced by bland paranoid chess players, servers of fragmentary warrants taken down in hebephrenic shorthand charging unspeakable mutilations of the spirit, bureaucrats of spectral departments, officials of unconstituted police states, a Lesbian dwarf who has perfected operation Bang-utot, the lung erection that strangles a sleeping enemy, sellers of orgone tanks and relaxing machines, brokers of exquisite dreams and memories tested on the sensitized cells of junk sickness and bartered for raw materials of the will, doctors skilled in the treatment of diseases dormant in the black dust of ruined cities, gathering virulence in the white blood of eyeless worms feeling slowly to the surface and the human host, maladies of the ocean floor and the stratosphere, maladies of the laboratory and atomic war... A place where the unknown past and the emergent future meet in a vibrating soundless hum... Larval entities waiting for a Live One…”  

So that’s quite a prose-poem actually. It’s a little like MTV. I think it was actually first published in Black Mountain Review number seven, by Robert Creeley, who, very early, recognized Burroughs’ quaint, precise, clear visual eye. So what you have is, like, a..panorama, (a) fast nightmarish panaroma, maybe more easy to understand these days when you have this sense of cut-up and jump-cut in music video, one image coming after another without explanation but building up a sense of..  well, futuristic-ness, or surreal nightmare intensity and outrageous post-Modern post-Scientific science-fiction end-of-the-planet ominousness. So that was Burroughs, the elder (gentleman) o that’s quite a prose-poem actually. It’s a little like MTV. I think it was actually first published in Black Mountain Review number seven, by Robert Creeley, who, very early, recognized Burroughs’ quaint, precise, clear visual eye. So what you have is, like, a..panorama, (a) fast nightmarish panaroma, maybe more easy to understand these days when you have this sense of cut-up and jump-cut in music video, one image coming after another without explanation but building up a sense of..  well, futuristic-ness, or surreal nightmare intensity and outrageous post-Modern post-Scientific science-fiction end-of-the-planet ominousness.
So that was Burroughs, the elder (gentleman)

As I’m going along, if you have any particular questions, you’re welcome to…


[Jack Kerouac - Photograph by Allen Ginsberg}

Next, I thought..  How many here know Kerouac’s Mexico City Blues? _ Not so many. So, I’ll read a couple of those.
 (Jack) Kerouac was a very interesting poet, turned on a lot of poets, actually, and had a big influence on American poetry, although, interestingly enough, he’s very rarely represented in any academic poetry anthology (or the regular anthologies that you get here – has anybody seen any Kerouac poems in any of the Norton’s or Macmillan’s or any of the school anthologies?) – So if you were to define academic as being the English professors that make anthologies that are used in high schools and colleges, Kerouac, then, has been totally rejected as a poet by the academy, but, at the same time, he’s a favorite of many of the (living) poets - almost every open-form, avant-garde, poet in America.. digs his Mexico City Blues, including Bob Dylan, and those who have been influenced by Dylan, (the entire folk-rock, later punk-rock and grunge ,world, really, up to Sonic Youth and U2, both directly influenced by Burroughs and by Kerouac indirectly)

"Starspangled Kingdom bedecked/in dewy joint - DON"T IGNORE OTHER PARTS/OF YOUR MIND, I think/And my clever brain sends/ripples of amusement/Through my leg nerve halls?And I remember the Zigzag/Original Mind/ of Babyhood/when you let the faces/crack & mock/& yak and change/& go mad utterly/in your night/ firstmind/ reveries/The endless Not Invisible/Madness Rioting/Everywhere" - (That's a pretty good description of everybody's subjective world of thinking and dreams That was the 17th Chorus)


"All great statements ever made/abide in death/All the magnificent and witty/rewards of French Lettrism /Abide in death/  All the Roman Sculptor/of Heroes, all Picassos/and Micassos and/ Macayos/and/Machados/ and K e r o u a c o' s - /even Asvaghosha's Glorious Statement/and Asanga's and Holy Sayadaw/and all the good and kind saints/and the divine unabstractable ones/the holy and perfect ones/ All Buddhas and Dharmas/All Jesuses and Jerusalems/And Jordans and How are You's/ - Nil, none, a dream./ A bubble pop, a foam snit/in the immensities of the sea/at midnight in the dark" - ((24th Chorus) That's pretty vivid - and quite real psychologically)


What else is good? – (49th Chorus) -  “They got nothing on me/ at the university/Them clever poets/of immensity/With charcoal suits/ and charcoal hair/And green armpits/and heaven air/ And cheques to balance/my account/In Rome benighted/by White Russians/Without care who puke/In windows/Everywhere/ They got nothing on me/'Cause I'm dead/They cant surpass me/'Cause I'm dead/And being dead/ I hurt my head/And now I wait /Without hate/For my fate/To estate"  - (So his "fate/To estate"  is now his big monument)….

Allen continues with the 50th Chorus -  (“Maybe I’m crazy, and my parts/Are scattered still - didn't gather/Em when form was passin out…"…"Maybe I'm an Agloon/doomed to be spitted/on the igloo stone/ of Some North mad")  -  (must’ve been high when he wrote that!) -  and the 51st Chorus - ("America is a permissible dream..") - (So..kind of interesting, for nationalist chauvanists) - "America is a permissible dream/Providing you remember ants/Have Americas and Russians/Like the Possessed have Americas/And little Americas are had/ By baby mules in misty fields…"…."Afternoon, when men/gamble and ramble & fuck/and women watch the wash/with one eye on the grocer boy/and one eye on the loon/and one eye/in the universe/in Tathagata's /Transcendental/orb of the balloon" 

  
- and the 54th (Chorus) - "One night in 1941 I was a kid/And ran away from college"…"Once I went to a movie/at midnight, 1940.."…"On both occasions I had wild/Face looking into lights/Of Streets where phantoms/Hastened out of sight/Into Memorial Cello Time" - 
(I always liked that - "Memorial Cello Time" - it's like an old home movie).

So (74th Chorus) - ""Darling!"/Red hot/That kind of camping/I don't object to/unless it's kept/within reason./ "This coffee is delicious"/ This is for Vidal/Didn't know I was / a Come-Onner, did you?/(Come-on-er)/ I am one of the world's/Great Bullshitters,/Girls/  Very High Cantos."


What else? - What else? – oh yes, there’s a very interesting one here from Lowell. His whole point is that (this is) spontaneous writing, (you) let the mind free and what rises you accept and work with and write it down, and if you’re able to do that, actually, you wind up making some kind of sense. So there’s one preliminary (85thh Chorus) – “Do you really need/ the right word/Do you really need/Of course it's all asinine/Forms of asininity/Once & for all/ Mr William Carlos/Wiliams/ Anyway,/An asinine form/which will end/all asininity/from now on/ That's a poem/The poem/Will end/Asininity". 


So the poem that ends asininity is the 97th Chorus, describing his father coming home in Lowell, drinking a beer - "Meanwhile there's my Pa, alone in street,/Coming for supper, under heaven bleak/The trees of March black twigs/Against the red and gory sundown/ That blazed across the River/sinking in the ocean to the East/beyond Salisbury's latest & last/ grain of sand./ Then all's wet underneath, to Eclipse/ (Ivan the Heaven Sea-Ice King, Euclid,/Bloody Be Jupiter, Nucleus/Nuclid, What's  His Name - the sea/ The  sea drang Scholar with mermaids,/Bloody blasted dad flap thorn it/ - N e p p y T u n e -)/All's wet clear in Neptune's Seat/Sensing the aura, the news/Of that frost, my father/Hurries in his Woe Street/Conscious he is a man/Doomed to mortal destiny./"And my poor lil Ti Pousse," -  ["little Jack", my poor little Jack] - "he thinks of me,/"He'll get it too". 

   
That was really interesting. He just improvised whatever came to his mind including the time he got on the tip of his tongue the word “Neptune”, which was on the tip of his tongue, and he couldn’t..  and it sounds like Shakespeare! - "The trees of March black twigs/Against the red and gory sundown/That blazed across the River/sinking in the ocean to the East/beyond Salisbury's latest & last/grain of sand" - (Salisbury is down around here?  yes? - so it makes sense, that word) - "beyond Salisbury's latest & last/grain of sand./ Then all's wet underneath, to Eclipse" - then the parenthesis - "(Ivan the Heaven Sea-Ice King, Euclid,/Bloody Be Jupiter, Nucleus/Nuclid, What's  His Name" - dash "- the sea/ The  sea drang Scholar with mermaids,/Bloody blasted dad flap thorn it/ - N e p p y T u n e"  - N-e-p-p-y-t-u-n-e!  - It’s so much fun, actually. It’s like a jazz musician, you know, skittering around until he gets straight on the tone.   

So that’s Kerouac, I don’t want to go on too long (on) just one, except he’s so…so much a part of late twentieth-century American Literature, and, amazingly, not everybody really knows his work that well. I ran into the actor, Johnny Depp (do you know who that is? anybody? - yeah), who is a Kerouac fan, and who was trying to film reading a couple of Kerouac’s Mexico City Blues, which he knew quite well, and liked a lot. The one that he was favored was from (one of the last ones) if I can find it, like a Shakespeare…yes?  like a Shakespeare sonnet. So all of Kerouac’s pessimism and Catholic horror of the flesh – “The wheel of the quivering meat/ conception.." (211th Chorus)….."Poor! I wish I was free/ of that slaving meat wheel/and safe in heaven dead" – (see how it rises to a climax with ”Poor!”, like real rhythm, real interesting rhythm, and American rhythm,.so that (Bob) Dylan thought that Kerouac.. So this book blew Bob Dylan’s mind. We were in the Edson cemetery here [in Lowell] filming, in 1975, and Dylan picked up Mexico City Blues and started to read from it, and I said..I asked him, how come & what he knew about it, and he said that, oh (that), it was his favorite book of poems, that someone had handed it to him in 1959 in St Paul and it blew his mind. And I said, why?,  and he said, it talked to me, the first book to talk to me, in my own language, American language, and that seems to be Kerouac's power.





to be continued

Friday, August 28, 2015

Friday's Weekly Round-Up - 233




Jack Kerouac on Allen Ginsberg. We've been featuring Ginsberg on Kerouac, but here's a pretty candid Kerouac-on-Ginsberg notebook entry.   Jack writes:

"Ginsberg - intelligent enuf - interested in the outward appearance and pose of great things, intelligent enuf to know where to find them, but once there he acts like Jerry Newman [sic] the photographer anxious to be photographed photographing. Ginsberg wants to run his hands up the backs of people, for this he gives and seldom takes - He is also a mental screwball - *(Tape recorder anxious to be tape recorded tape recording) (like Seymour Barab anxious to have his name in larger letters than Robert Louis Stevenson, like Stieglitz  & Verlaine, Rimbaud, Baudelaire"



Rick Dale of The Daily Beat reminds us the annual, local-boy-makes-good, Lowell Jack Kerouac celebrations are coming up (early October) and offers a secret word. 

Also in October, (actually, opening this weekend) - "We are continually exposed to the flashbulb of death" (the University of Toronto Allen Ginsberg photo show) travels to Nova Scotia - to the Mount Saint Vincent University Art Gallery - see here 

[Allen in India - "From Roof of Brahmin's house wherein we'd rented third floor room six months, December to May 1963, could see past temple mandir tops across Ganges River to other shore. Our balconieshung over vegetable-meat market one side, other side overlooked sacred street down to Dasaswamedh Ghat bathing steps peopled by pilgrims beggars & cows; monkeys visited and snatched our bananas, Peter Orlovsky held my Retina, Benares India Spring 1963." (Ginsberg caption) c. Estate of Allen Ginsberg]

Deborah Baker's Allen-in-India note, "Allen Ginsberg, A Calcutta Story",  that we spotlighted here last week, (via The Sunflower Collective)  has been republished on The Wire and is available - here

Doug Holder (who we also spotlighted last week) features his friend, Karen Alkalay-Gut and her thoughts upon visiting Allen's New Jersey burial site - here


Also on sites housing Allen's remains - in Colorado, see here 


- and Jerusalem - here



Steve Silberman's review for the Shambhala Sun of the Philip Whalen biography, Crowded By Beauty, is, naturally, a rave one - "not only one of the most keenly observed books on the Beats ever published, but..also a fascinating exploration of the life and dharma of one of the first American-born teachers" - Steve on "The Beat of Philip Whalen" - see here don't miss it 

Here's Lynell George's review in the LA Times of the Ginsberg-Ferlinghetti Letters

and 

Paris-based American poet passed away this week,
Stephen Rodefer RIP  (1940-2015)

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Ginsberg 1982 Kerouac Workshop Conclusion (Q & A)

                                                           [Jack Kerouac with the scroll]

AG: I have three twenty-nine [looking at the clock]. I brought, as I said, those papers and so we will distribute them. There's two sets two different things. Maybe if we… they can pass them out themselves, if we just hand them.. Or we can put them in two piles here and people can pick them up as they leave, maybe?  That might be the easiest way. The one who did all the xeroxing for you is a poet, Gregg R. (sic) from Indianapolis, So I have these sets.. one of these pages is the Kerouac "Essentials of Modern Prose" ["Essentials of Spontaneous Prose" [sic], the other is a list of all of the Greek rhythms - and - how long does this class have? - is it over now? So..we can stay a little bit.. okay..okay.. So what is the next step, any questions? yes?

Student: Will the second (next) workshop cover spontaneous poetics also? 

AG: No, I think I'll go on to something else, I'll make it up next time. I would like to get more into.. In the workshops, having laid this ground, I would like to get further on into making up stuff, making up chain poems and actual exercises in class. I think I might go over a few more of the mind-trick things but one major mind-trick which we went through today was, when you get up, it's alright if you have a blank mind. In fact, it's an advantage, if you're unprepared. To be unprepared and unready is an advantage, because, then, whatever rises is really spontaneous on the spot. Better than..  I think, in this case, better than the situation.. better practice than if you write it down in your book and you've got it there and you can just get up and read it. Better to learn how to think on your feet, or better to learn how to remember what you just thought, on your feet, I think. That's the principle. Remembering what you just thought. rather than making up thoughts - Or, pronouncing your thoughts as they rise. Few people did that, you know, making up the words as they went along. That's the most interesting - stumbling along with the words. Yes?



Student: Allen how do you distinguish the automatic writings of the Surrealists from…

AG: Well, I don't know if the question rises, if one needs to distinguish them. I mean, is there any reason to make a distinction..?

Student: … Because some of the comments that were made to the effect that (Jack) Kerouac really created something completely new..

AG: Yes.

Student: ..in his approach, and..

AG: Well, what Kerouac would do, would be, say, to take the theme, run it through his mind once, the theme of a novel, the story, chronologically, maybe even making notes on the major items to be covered, like you might put on a…

Student (2): Can you speak up?

AG: ..like you might put on a card. Kerouac would run through the numbers of items to be covered (like he might put on a note card), run through once with hs mind, and then, when he's sat at the typewriter, expand and blow spontaneously. So you get your theme in mind first (that's why I suggested "Tender Wine", say -  or something to begin with. And then you invent conceptions as you go along. In Surrealist writing, very often there wasn't some basic chronological story-plot-theme.  He did follow a chronological story, or, in the case of Visions of Cody, a list of visionary, or epiphanous, moments that he wanted to describe. The structure of the novel of Visions of Cody was the..different moments.. the different vivid moments that he had experienced with Neal (Cassady). And so, instead of having chapters in a chronological novel, he had flashes that he was describing. So the flashes became huge chapters. And he tried to describe every association that he had with those flashes. Like one time going into a urinal with Neal and pissing and they were bonded, sort of, with each other and Neal saying,"I love you, man, don't you know it?". So that one moment of, like, truth between them, that one moment of heart-feeling, stuck as a kind of visionary moment, or epiphanous moment, or vivid moment. So he tried to… that was like the jewel-center of interest for that one chapter - and then, many different chapters with different centers of interest. So, in other words, there was a subject, so to speak. But it was the ravings of the mind on that one subject, or the extension of the mind on that one subject. Yeah?

Student: I remember something I was really impressed by…

AG: Maybe we can use the microphone so that it gets recorded properly?

Student: In this whole idea of spontaneous prose, I remember reading when I read the
Ramayana, (some people may be familiar with) that, when Valmiki, the poet, had sat under.. by the river, and had been covered up by the ant-hill and only his eyes showed through , and Narada, the music-maker came down and said, "You've got to write this great poem and save Sita", and all this. And he said, "But I can't, I don't know anything about the story". And Narada said (it seems to me, if I recall correctly) to reply, "You've been sitting there, you've been workiing on your mind, you've gained wisdom, don't worry about the details, here's the subject - the story of Rama and Sita - don't worry about it, the music will start, you just start telling it and it will all come to you. Interestingly enough, that seems to be exactly what we're now talking about, and, of course, that's one of the ancient poems of all times. 

[Narada meets Valmiki  - Kangra style, Pahari, early 19th century miniature (40.6 x 55.7 cms) from the National Museum, New Delhi]

AG: My advice from Kerouac, the advice Kerouac gave me was, "Just start writing from the middle of your mind, or start talking from the middle of your mind, and whatever comes up will be acceptable and more interesting than if you try and figure it out and craft it in advance". And I think there was a crucial moment when he proved it to me. I had the… I kept little notebooks, as I do now, and  I had a couple of notes in there, a couple of pages of notes about the Statue of Liberty, and "the sea of darkness", and "copper green goddess waving", or something like that, and he said, "Why don't you type that out?". And I said, "Well, I have to work it up into a poem". And he said, "Well, you've got it there already, written down, why don't you just type it up?" - "Type it up" - Richmond Hill - so he sat me at his typewriter and he made me type it up, and I typed it up, and it spread all over the page like a William Carlos Williams poem - about 1950 - and I said, "Gee, I never wrote like that before?". And he said, "But you did. You've been writing all the time before  in your book, you just don't think of it as writing, because you think of rhymes, and even verses, as writing". And I realized probably what I had written down there about the Statue of Liberty was just as interesting as anything else I was writing. In fact, more raw, therefore more readable. And I had a similar experience in (19)72 with Chogyam Trungpa, who said, "Why do you need a piece of paper when you get up on the stage to read off. Don't you trust your own mind?". I said, "What do you mean?'. He said, "Why don't you do like the great poets did, like Milarepa and all those other people, they just got up there and spoke, they pronounced from their spontaneous mind. So there is that possibility that we can do. It's what actually happens when you sit at a page anyway - you're doing the same thing, you're writing down what you think of. So you can do it when you get up. The idea is to.. to get up, to get up and have the courage to do it, and do it, and not be afraid to be a fool. Not being afraid of being a fool, because, as I said last night, everybody's a big dope to begin with! - And anybody who thinks they aren't, and tries to cover it up by making a smart poem, is just a hypocrite who's going to deceive himself and others and write boring poetry anyway! Most interesting poetry is foolish (or, as Kerouac said, "genius is funny").  So..Paul [sic]?  A question?….

Q: (Will you be collecting these [workshop assignments that you've given] and giving them back in the next workshop?)

AG:  No.. Will the same people be in the next workshop?, no.  What I can do is collect (them), check them out -  (it'll take me a day or two) -  and then I'll find a way of leaving them out at the next workshop. Or, okay, to make it precise, I will leave them at the Naropa Information desk. Put your names on them so that you can identify them. And what I'll do with them is make a little star by the ones I think have some concrete, factual, presentative substance. I'll try and point out what I like. I won't do any criticism of what isn't there. I'll point out what I think is there, as active language, or active picture. Okay? - Yes?

Q:  What is your view about editing, after you go through the spontaneous part?

AG: Well, I do. If it's...  Kerouac burned his bridges behind him, and programmatically did not edit (he said). He did probably edit a little in typing up. I generally try to retain the first impulse, tho' I edit quite a bit. And five years later, if I still haven't published something, I find lots of excessive extra participles and words and pronouns, so I generally cut it, blue-pencil, but not alter the basic sequence of thoughts. I try and keep to the original sequence of thought, because that's organic.

Q: Does a poem take place as something outside the poet, that's discovered by the poet, or is it... 

AG: I think it exists inside the poet and is discovered by the poet, inside, in the sense of, already-existent, a thought that he thought, maybe even in words thathe thought, but he didn't think was a poem until someone said, "Oh, that was interesting". Like, when Kerouac said,"Ah, this is a Beat Generation". He didn't mean to make a pronouncement that this was a Beat Generation. John Holmes said, "That's a  great line!",  so John Holmes made a big article in the New York Times - "This is the Beat Generation" - Kerouac didn't mean it that way. He just thought it was a beat generation, meaning, this is not a particular generation. The un-generation.. He meant to un-name a generation, not to name it. But his un-naming was so witty that it became, that when seen by somebody else it became a name poem, so to speak, a one-liner. But it was just a thought, a raw thought.

Q: In a recent interview, Richard Hell… 

AG: Yeah

Q: ...had said that's what he meant when he coined the phrase "blank generation" - It's not blank as in stupid blank, but it was blank as in fill-in-the-blank…and he got all misconstrued too...



AG: You know Richard Hell lives in the same apartment building that me and Larry Fagin live in in New York. Fellow poets. And he comes from the St Marks Poetry Project too. Any other..Paul [sic]..did you have..  did somebody else have a question… Yes?

Q: Are you actually saying that when you go back over certain stuff that you've created that you have not frequently said "I don't like it", and, in fact, almost always keep it? 

AG; Well, what I do is I write in a notebook, and then I have the notebooks typed up here at Naropa by my students, and then I go through it and correct the typescript, then, generally, more or less intact, it's publishable. The things that I consider poems are sort of the hot items that are written out in lines that look like poems, so I excerpt those and put them in books. Sometimes I condense those by going through and blue-penciling something I've said twice or where my attention has lagged in the sense that it doesn't make sense or the description is lacking in facts, or where I begin generalizing. But that doesn't happen too often. I try not to anymore. It's.. The reason I try not to generalize in my original work is that I write so much that it's too much trouble to edit. So I try to write so that I don't have to edit later, because I know I'll never get around to really editing later on. So it's just a question of labor-saving device. Don't write any bullshit to begin with, then you don't have to edit it! - Really, it's serious. I mean, if you're young and you've got days, twenty-four-hour days ahead of you, and you don't have anybody on your neck, and you don't have anybody to get laid with and you don't have any classes to teach and you don't have any airplanes to take,then you can take your time and, you know, write what's not interesting, but if you're pressed for time, you actually have to speak now or forever hold your peace, because you won't have time to go back and retrace your steps, is what I find. I don't have time to go back, so therefore I have to make it utter..utterly utter at the utterance (partly laziness also). Okay. Thank you for your attention. 

[Audio can be heard here, beginning at approximately seventy-two-and-a-quarter minutes  in and concluding at approximately eighty-five minutes in 

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Workshop Poetry Assigment - Part 3 (Tender Wine)




AG: Next thing. Gregory Corso-esque method,. Now Gregory's method is, having accomplished some grounding (whether or not we did it, we'll say we did it, so we'll go on to the next stage), having accomplished some grounding, and assuming that we're able to talk about real things and present some kind of real things. and assuming that we can get up on our feet and pronounce syllables into the great horn of space that will echo throughout the universe, pronouncing our consonants clearly, so that the geniuses of Mars can hear our thoughts vocalized, the next thing would be doing the same sort of shot but without having to worry to write it down on a piece of paper, but doing it like the ancient bards and the more classical and traditional poetry, which is not written down, or was not written down for maybe twenty-thousand years. They only started writing these things down a couple of thousand years ago, remember, which is just, you know, the blink of an eye in terms of human history. Most of the time people just talked or made them up or sang them or chanted them or made up their images and traded them to each other, or traded back and forth, or capped each others pronouncement. And it still is a tradition in America in the form of blues, in the form of street-corner rapping, in the form of funny drunken conversation between journalists at bars on Forty-first street and Second Avenue, or students goofing around in fraternity houses, or poetry classes, or peopkle making up dialogue in movies, (if they're funny, and if they're working for Robert Frank or something).

So, Gregory's form for this kind of thing is to take a one-word concept , like DeathMarriage, Bomb, Army, Hair, and then, figure all the funny lines possible, or, touch on all the conceptions that you can think of relating to hair - there's bald people, there's people with long hair, there's pony-tails, there's frizzy hair, there's red hair, there's dyed hair, there's no hair, there's baby hair, there's hair that's dead, there's hair in the graves, there's hair on the barber-shop floor, there's hair in the sky. So that's a little poem about hair. I mean, whatever comes to mind, all the different hair.  

…it involves some kind of presentation of an idea or a fact or a thing, or - a think, a think that goes between one ear and the other, a think that occurs to you. And we might do this in the form of a chain poem. So what would be a good subject? Has anybody got a good suggestion for a good big serious subject that will evoke torrents of imagery?

Student: Sex.

AG: Well, but what kind of sex? - Sex - Sex? - Okay. Sex is not enough… Let us say, Affection. Affection, (which could mean anything from sex to good feeling), that's the basic, that'll be behind it, let us say. But lets choose a key word. relating to sex, or affection, or love, or good feeling, heart feeling, that would evoke.. that we could all handle with that (you know, some people don't want to go directly into sex and some people want to go right in).
Okay, what's a key word that we can say that we can begin it with?



Student: Wine
AG: Pardon me?
Student: Wine
AG: Wine-tender?  Tender wine? - Tender wine. I like tender wine. So let's begin. Everybody begin their line with Tender wine - W-I-N-E.
Student: The wine of the grape?
AG: Yes, the wine of the grape. So it's got to be at the beginning of the sentence, like "Tender wine is my foot bath", or "I like tender wine when I go to the drugstore and buy aspirins", or something, whatever, or, I don't know. So, "tender wine" is built into the..   The title of the poem is "Tender Wine", right? - "Tender"and "Wine". And so, what we should do is, each one, get up and make a line, make up a line, using "tender wine" in it. I was suggesting in the beginning, but, you can put it anywhere in the line. So that's the rules of our game, children. Okay, so we have this big baby game with "tender wine"
AG: "Tender wine is what I drag in eternity from my baby shoes" - Shall we use a mic and get it down? - I'll repeat each line so it'll get recorded.

Student: "Tender wine filling a slipper in a yacht, throwing it over the side".
AG: Tender wine filling a slipper in a yacht, throwing it over the side. 

Student: "Tender wine. Every time I drink with my friends I get gushy and love them".
AG: Tender wine. Every time I drink with my friends I get gushy and love them.

Student: "I want to swim forever in Tender wine".
AG: I want to swim forever in Tender wine. No, anything written down you may not use. Get up onto your feet and make it up out of your head. That's the rules!… It's alright, if you get up and you don't know what to say - that's good. Blank your mind first, and then the first thought that comes after the blank mind, see. So, if you get up and you can't think of what to say, you've got your advantage already! You make use of that, you make use of it, see, because then the thought springs unborn

Student: "Tender wine goes nice in the soft night with my thoughts".
AG: Tender wine goes nice in the soft night with my thoughts.

Student: "Tender wine bloated my stomach last night".
AG:  Tender wine bloated my stomach last night.

Student: "Tender wine, give me a drink, o baby, o baby, o baby".
AG: Tender wine, give me a drink, o baby, o baby, o baby".
Student: "Tender wine, I drink so much".
AG: Finish more, a little bit more..a little more onto the line, add a little bit more on, just a little, add a few more words -  Tender wine, I drink so much of you, that..?
Student:  "Tender wine, I drink so much of you, that the place you sleep I floated".
AG: "the place you sleep I floated".

Student: "Tender wine falling from the clear blue sky and washing my dirty feet".
AG: Tender wine falling from the clear blue sky and washing my dirty feet.

Student: "Tender wine, so hard on Kerouac. My god, it makes me sick the next day".
AG: Tender wine, so hard on Kerouac. My god, it makes me sick the next day.

Student:  "Tender wine, I fell in your eyes, Dionysus."
AG: Tender wine, I fell in your eyes, Dionysus.

Student: "Tender wine flows through my body an makes it tingle".
AG: Tender wine flows through my body an makes it tingle.

Student: "I waste my time on tender wine".
AG: I waste my time on tender wine.

Student: "I think I need some tender wine to help me pass my breakfast".
AG: I think I need some tender wine to help me pass my breakfast.

Student: "My words are soaked and sour with tender wine".
AG: My words are soaked and sour with tender wine.

Student: "A great chortle of friendship along with tender wine".
AG: A great chortle of friendship along with tender wine.
Student: "Tender wine is the time I spend with those I love".
AG: Tender wine is the time I spend with those I love - Get some dis-harmony in it -" tender wine is the time I spent with.. the dogs in the gutter", or something…

Student: "Tender wine that you drunk with me last night stained my lips".
AG: Tender wine that you drunk with me last night stayed on my lips.
Student: Stained my lips
AG: Stayed my lips?
Student: Stained
AG: Stained my lips!

Student: Tender wine makes me sweat profusely
AG: Right. Tender wine makes me sweat profusely 

Student: Because I'm here, I don't drink tender wine 
AG: Because I'm here, I don't drink tender wine 

Student: I wandered through the cemetery with tender wine giving them to ghosts on either side.
AG: I wandered through the cemetery with tender wine giving them to ghosts?
Student:    ..on either side
AG:  "on either side". Very good, o ghost!

Student: I have no mind about tender wine
AG:  I have no mind about tender wine

Student: All alone but for tender wine and red eyes
AG: All alone but for tender wine and red eyes

Student: Tender wine, please
AG: Tender wine, please?
Student:  If it was all juiced on top and run in from the showers dripping tender wine would run from my ears into the small mole below your nipple.

AG:  If it was all juiced on top and..?
Student 2: I don't remember it.
AG: I know, it would run down your small nipples to your balls..can somebody remember it?  - "If it was all juiced on tender wine…"
Student:  ...running into the showers...
AG: "running into the showers"
Student 2: it would  be falling down my ears…
AG: "It would be falling from my ears down to the.."
Student 3: Belly-button
AG:  "...to the mole beneath your nipple." We got it! - retrieved your tender wine, sir!   


Student: Tender wine buried my mind like a rotted spine 
AG: Tender wine buried my mind like a ?
Student: Rotted spine
AG: ."..like a rotted spine"? in thrall to rhyme! - You don't have to begin with "tender wine", you know.


Student: My two-year-old's whining -  tender wine
AG: My two-year-old's whining -  tender wine
Tender wine id a caress to the throat's center

Student: Tender wine stuffed up my sinuses could blow out my brain.
AG: Tender wine stuffed up my sinuses cuold block my brain?
Student: "blow out"
AG: "could blow out my brain"? - Tender wine stuffed up my sinuses could blow out my brain


Student: Tender wine served in two crystal glasses, one for me and one for you.
AG: Tender wine served into.. served in  two crystal glasses, one for me and one for you - 
Say something outrageous about tender wine. You don't have to be so sensible!

Student: Tender wine is good fun, but if you meet any of the old prophets, it's good if you've brought your own car
Student: Tender wine is good fun, but if you meet any of the old prophets, it's good if you've brought your own…?
Student: Car
AG: Car - C-A-R?  - right - that's alright. Now we're getting to the heart of the matter. More and more outrageous now. Let's build it up in the imagination. What about them Tender Wine Saturns and…



Student: Tender wine warms my blood and makes me want  to do nothing other than bay at the moon 
AG: Tender wine warms my blood and makes me want  to do nothing other than bay at the moon 

Student: Tender wine-colored postage-stamps sends off my masturbation
AG: Tender wine-colored postage-stamps sends off my masturbation masterpiece

Student: Tender wine gives tender hearts tender mind
AG: Tender wine gives tender hearts tender wine?
Student: Tender mind
AG: Tender mind.

Student: Cold moon guzzles broken teeth soothes tender wine
AG: Cold moon guzzles broken teeth soothes tender wine

Student: When I drink too much tender wine then I become a weirdo and I start talking about people's ears
AG: When I drink too much tender wine then I become a weirdo and I start talking about people's ears.

Student: Tender wine, tender wine, I drink great sacramental blood of the ninety-proof Thunderbird
AG: Tender wine, tender you wine you drink…?"
Student:  The great sacramental blood of the ninety-proof Thunderbird. 
AG: The great sacaramental  of the ninety-proof Thunderbird?
Student: Long live Charles Bukowski!
AG: Long live Charles Bukowski? Well, don't drink yourself to death, muscle boy!


Student: "Your tender wine opens beehives in my heart".
AG: Hmm, Surrealism - "Your tender wine opens beehives in my heart".

Student: "Pour tender wine into the hole in my head and feed the hawk".
AG: "Pour tender wine into the hole in my head and feed the hawk".

Student:  "Bathe me in tender wine, you soft gushy grapes".
AG: Bathe me in tender wine of?
Student: "You soft…"
AG: Oh, "Bathe me in tender wine, you soft gushy grapes" - Gushy?

Student:Tender wine - truth and time
AG: Tender wine truth? at time?
Student: Tender wine - truth and time
AG: Truth and time? - See..say it again, say it loud, proclaim it!
Student: Tender wine - truth and time
AG: Okay but one more time. Get up there. Straighten your back. Literally, straighten your back, straight up and down, put your hands to your sides, take your hands out of your pocket, please, sir - now proclaim
Student: Tender wine - truth and time
AG: And one more time, pronouncing the "and" very clearly.
Student: Tender wine - truth and time
AG: Right. Much better to hear. 

Student: "Last night, tender wine and hair in my mouth. This morning on my shirt hang over like twelve swedes.
AG:  Hmm -  Last night, tender wine and hair on my shirt..
Student; No, in my mouth, not on my shirt.
AG: Right,  Last night, tender wine and hair in my mouth?
Student: This morning on my shirt hang-over like twelve swedes.  
AG:  This morning on my shirt hang-over like twelve swedes. Hmm, that's a good one - " tender wine and hair in my mouth
Student: And you have cast your spell on me.. 
AG: I couldn't hear
Student; And you have cast your spell on me, tender wine, and I'm doomed forever  (It refers to alcoholism)
AG: And you have cast your spell on me, tender wine, and I'm doomed forever - to alcoholism.
Student 2: To become an alcoholic
AG: Become an alcoholic.  Yes..

Student: After a toke on a spliff, tender wine, right out of the bottle runs down...
AG: After a toke on a spliff, tender wine, right out of the bottle runs down…
Student: No, spills out my mouth, runs down your chest making a pool of your navel
AG: Tender wine runs down my chest making a pool of your navel - and?
Student: And a river between your thighs
AG: And a river between your thighs ("Spliff" is a nice word in there)

Student: Tender wine every gallon  demands another
AG: Tender wine every gallon demands another
Student: I suck, I'm too fast!
AG: "I suck, I'm too fast", is that what you said?

Student: Envelopes filled with tender wine stuff my futon give me sweet dreams tonight
AG: Envelopes filled with tender wine stuff my futon, comma,  give me sweet dreams tonight - "Stuffed" or "stuff"?
Student: Stuff
AG: Present tense, okay

Student: Tender wine turns the wheel, the wheel, the wheel,  O what have they done to the grapes?
AG: Tender wine turns the wheel, the wheel, the wheel,  O what have they done to the grapes? 

Student: Even tender wine can't compete with beer cheer
AG: Even tender wine can't compete with beer cheer
Student (2): Wanna bet?
AG: Blow my mind with tender wine



Student:" I basted my brain in tender wine and brushed off my breast like the ash of my recreated eyes".
AG: Brushed off my brain with tender wine...? 
Student: "I basted my brain in tender wine and brushed off my breast like the ash of my recreated eyes".
AG: "brushed off my breast like the ash of my recreated eyes" - that's a good mouthful - Next?  Sir? Who's next?

Student: Tender wine on the brain.

[Allen notices Peter Orlovsky departing]

AG: Hey Peter, what's your tender wine line before you leave? Peter Orlovsky.. One line at a.. what?.. It has to be a line with "tender wine" in it
PO: Tender wine is very good and very sweet and very round
AG: And round? Come on, give us a better line than that. Another line?
PO: (I gave you all that..)
AG: Have you been drinking tender wine?
PO: Not today, No.
AG: Toodle-oo - Next.

Student: My goldfish don't think tender wine and candles are romantic, get them out of my aquarium
AG: My goldfish don't think tender wine and candles are romantic, get them out of my aquarium

Student: Tender wine isn't when you piss it 
AG: Tender wine isn't when you piss it - Louis Zukofsky wrote poems like that, that is, very intteresting little sounds - "Tender wine isn't when you piss it" - It's like "with hey with hey, the thrush and the jay" - or, William Carlos Williams has a poem that ends, "I shall do my pees (the doctor, you know, taking care of pee and blood tests). "I shall do my pees instead", hmm, "Peggy has a little (bit of ) albumen/ in hers" - "Peggy has a little (bit of ) albumen/ in hers"..

Student (to Allen!): You must speak more clearly!  Enunciate your consonants!
AG: "Peggy has a little (bit of ) albumen/ in hers" - " "I shall do my pees" - "Peggy has a little (bit of ) albumen/ in hers" 

Student: "Tender wine , lick my Rockerbelly home."
AG: Tender wine , lick my Rockerbelly home? - Right

Student: "Tender wine.."
AG: No, get up, up. 
Student: "Tender wine/ savage head/ beer for breakfast".
AG: Savage?
Student: Head
AG:  "Tender wine/ savage head/ beer for breakfast".

Student: "Don't put tender wine in milk bottles",
AG:  Don't put tender wine in milk bottles.
Student (2): Why not?

Student: "Tender wine, rice wine, sake, and first drunk delicately from porcelain cups, an hour later guzzled from green Shimane bottles now thunder wine".
AG: Well, let's see if I can remember that one- " Tender wine.. something sake what?..tender wine.."
Student: "Tender wine, rice wine…"
AG: "Rice wine, sake. At first drunk delicately from porcelain cups…"
Student: "an hour later, guzzled from green Shimane bottles, tender wine now thunder wine".
AG:  "an hour later, guzzled from green Shimane? bottles - guzzled from what?
Student: Shimane  - sake was first made in Shimane.
AG: So...guzzled from green Shimane bottles?
Student: "now thunder wine"
AG:Next..


Student: "Thunderbird  ain't tender wine", 
AG:  "Thunderbird ain't tender wine" - Da-da da da da-da da - next..

Student; "With enough tender wine you don't need the hard stuff".
AG: With enough tender wine you don't need the hard stuff.
Student: That's a bit of a double-entendre!

Student: "Please bring me tender wine because it's half-time. That wine moves out of me in my sweat and makes me the wind".
AG: Okay, one more time, so I can repeat it properly.
Student: "Please bring me tender wine.."
AG: Please bring me tender wine
Student: "Because it's half-time.."
AG: Because it's half-time
Student: "That wine moves out of me in my sweat.."
AG:  That wine moves out of me in my sweat
Student: "And makes me the wind."
AG: And makes me the wind?

Student: "Sometimes tender wine makes all the difference in the world".
AG: Sometimes tender wine makes all the difference in the world". 

Student: "Tender wine soaks my mind clear of ancient horror"
AG: Tender wine soaks my mind clear of ancient horror.

Student: "Like pearls before swine, me and tender wine"
AG:  Like pearls before swine, me and tender wine!

Student: "The railroad man says it was tender wine. Now I only walk through splintered morning streets".
AG: The railroad man says it was tender wine. Now I only walk through splintered morning streets

Student: "Give me another sip of  tender wine, Father, for Christ's sake!"
AG: Give me another sip of  tender wine, Father, for Christ's sake!



Student: "An open face and a broken mind, tender wine can have me on tenterhooks anytime".
AG: An open face and a broken mind, tender wine can have me on tenterhooks anytime - 

AG: You can't stay here if you don't get up on your feet and pronounce your "tender wine", so please get up on your feet. You've shared our company, you have to share your mind, please.

Student: "Rachel's breasts are poisoned by tender wine". 
AG: Grateful breasts are poisoned by tender wine? - Grateful's breasts are poisoned…" - Rachel's breasts are poisoned by tender wine.

Student: "Tender wine, foamy cells, seem to alert up the noise".
AG: "Tender wine - bovis cells seems.."?
Student: "Foamy cells seem to…"
AG:  "..seem to alert up the noise. Is that "bovis" - the store? - bevos? - tender wine bevos cells? bovis cells? -What is bovis? or bevos? - Is that a store?
Student: No
AG: Then I didn't understand the word.  "Tender wine…?"
Student: "Tender wine, foamy cells…:
AG: Bony cells?
Student: Foamy
AG: Foamy! - Foamy!
Student: "Foamy cells - seem to alert up the noise".
AG: "seem to alert up the noise". Okay

Student: I just walked in
AG: That's fine, You're here, come come..
Student: "Tender wine, you will not embarass me, Allen Ginsberg, on tender wine".
AG: Tender wine, you will not embarass me, Allen Ginsberg, on tender wine - You with the root-beer in your hand! 
Well, is there anybody that didn't get any tender wine?

Student: I got one Allen
AG: Oh
Student: "Too much tender wine makes even Chogyam Trungpa sweet and sappy like a Second Avenue drunk".
AG: "Too much tender wine makes even Chogyam Trungpa sweet and sappy like a Second Avenue drunk". Well, that's pretty good

[Audio can be heard here, beginning at approximately forty-seven-and-a-quarter minutes  in and concluding at approximately seventy-two-and-a-quarter minutes in]